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Course Descriptions

Curriculum - Common Core (14-17 credits*)

BUS 640        Quantitative and Analytical Fundamentals for Finance (4 credits)
Background preparation in microeconomics, quantitative methods, accounting, and finance.
[**For MSF students, this course takes the place of FIN 641 and FIN 642, to which many of the course descriptions you see below refer**]

FIN 643           Quantitative Finance and Market Microstructure (2 credits)
This course exposes students to the fast growing field of market microstructure. Students will learn about different trading mechanisms encountered in financial markets today, how information affects prices and liquidity, what algorithms practitioners use to implement their trading strategies, and some basic models of market microstructure. The course ends with a brief description of several common quantitative trading strategies. 

FIN 650           Financial Investment (2 credits)
This course builds on FIN 641 and FIN 642 to provide a more advanced knowledge of the field of investments, particularly the fixed income markets, portfolio construction, asset pricing, and behavioral biases affecting financial decisions.

FIN 670           Corporate Finance (2 credits)                        
Finance 670 builds on Finance 641 and 642 and focuses on financial decision making from a corporation’s perspective. Issues addressed include capital structure, management of corporate liabilities, leasing and other asset-based financing techniques, advanced treatment of capital budgeting and some of the complex issues involved, and corporate mergers and acquisitions.

FIN 681           Financial Institutions (2 credits)
Finance 681 builds on Finance 641 and 642 and focuses on the management of financial institutions, such as banks. Topics include risk management; deposits and deposit insurance, liquidity, reserve requirements, capital adequacy, liability management, investment interest rate risk; and current issues connected with financial institutions.

FIN 686           Financial Decision Making (2 credits)
The goal of this course is to use decision-making theory to better understand why investors, money managers, and corporate managers often make suboptimal economic and financial decisions. The first part of the course focuses on the basic techniques and models that a manager or an investor can use to make effective financial decisions. The second part of the course focuses on the psychological, social, and cultural determinants of suboptimal investor and managerial behavior. In addition, the course examines the impact of those mistakes for financial markets (e.g., price bubbles) and the overall economy. The course should be useful to individuals who work in a corporate setting or at a money management firm (mutual funds, hedge funds, pension funds, etc.).  

BUS 600* or BUS 602* Critical Thinking and Effective Writing (1 credit)

BUS600*           Fundamentals of Critical Thinking and Effective Writing (1 credit)            
Critical thinking skills are developed by studying questions that transcend any single business discipline. Utilizing a variety of written formats, students hone analytic and persuasive skills, with emphasis on identifying critical issues, developing reasoned positions, and making compelling written arguments.

BUS602*           Critical Thinking and Effective Writing (1 credit)                             
Critical thinking skills are developed by studying questions that transcend any single business discipline. Utilizing a variety of written formats, students hone analytic and persuasive skills, with emphasis on identifying critical questions, developing reasoned positions, and making compelling written arguments.

BUS 603*          Critical Thinking and Effective Speaking (1 credit) 
Builds on critical thinking and writing skills acquired in BUS600/602. Topics include oral persuasion, prepared and impromptu speeches and dealing with the media, defending one’s view before adversarial audiences, display of data, and effective use of visual aids.

BUS604*           MBA Career Development and Enrichment (1 credit)
This course will expose students to a variety of academic and industry career lectures, events, and workshops to enhance their MBA experience. The focus is to establish added-value to an MBA student through real world and relevant access to information and resources beyond the traditional curriculum.

The Master’s of Science in Finance program is a 35 credit program. By demonstrating sufficient proficiency and preparation, students have an opportunity to waive out of up to 3 one-credit enrichment courses before beginning the program. To earn a Master’s of Science in Finance, a student will need to earn no less than 32 credits from department approved graduate courses.



Corporate Finance Advanced Curriculum (18 credits)

BSL 691           The Public Corporation: Legal Perspectives (2 credits)
The Public Corporation: Legal Perspectives reviews the laws governing the formation, operation, regulation, and governance of the public corporation with the objective of providing the graduate business student a sophisticated examination of the legal and social aspects of managing the money of others. Further, the course examines the rules and regulations governing the raising of capital from the public through the sale of securities for the development of and investment in a private enterprise.

ACC 672           Advanced Financial Analysis (2 credits)
Advanced Financial Analysis and Valuation builds on the analytical techniques developed in the basic financial statement analysis course, Accounting 670: Financial Reporting and Analysis, to augment your understanding of more complex financial reporting issues and to introduce you to the valuation of equity investments. The viewpoint is that of the user of financial statements, particularly from the standpoint of an equity investor or purchaser of a business. We discuss each financial reporting issue in terms of its effect on assessments of a firm’s profitability and risk.  This course is designed primarily for students who expect to be intensive users of financial statements as part of their professional responsibilities.

FIN 671           Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance (2 credits)
This course builds directly on Finance 670 and on the MBA core classes, Finance 641 and Finance 642, and relies mainly on the analysis and vigorous class discussion of a variety of real-world cases. The cases cover a broad range of topics, including short-and long-term financing, capital budgeting decisions, corporate valuation, hedging with options and futures, dividend policy and share repurchases, corporate financial strategy, and other current issues in corporate finance.

FIN 674           Financial Analysis of Mergers and Acquisitions (2 credits)
This course is designed to develop an understanding of (1) the economic and financial issues involved in the acquisition of a company; (2) the analytical valuation tools used to evaluate an acquisition; and (3) potential and empirical stock market reaction to an acquisition. Students are then asked to apply their understanding of the issues to analyze cases involving various aspects of acquisition.

FIN 679           Private Equity and Venture Capital (2 credits)
In this course, you will learn about the private equity (PE) industry, composed of both venture capital (VC) and buyouts (BO).  The focus is on how PE investors evaluate, select, value, and structure deals. The course will improve your understanding of corporate finance by applying central concepts and tools to a new and increasingly important industry.  The course will also introduce you to the institutions of the PE industry.  This involves examining, for example, how contracts are structured to reduce asymmetric information problems and agency costs that are endemic to any PE investment.  In addition, the students will learn about the valuation process used by PE investors.

FIN 683           Financial Modeling (2 credits)
This course takes a variety of finance topics and implements them using practical spreadsheet models. Students will use the intent and financial databases to obtain input data for their models. Students will learn Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to design functions and macros that will enhance their models. In addition to class time, this course will meet in a computer lab (a classroom) for hands-on instruction. Students are presumed to have a working knowledge of Windows and Excel.

FIN 685           Mathematics of Financial Derivatives (2 credits)
Finance 685 builds on Finance 650, 660, and 670. This course provides an in-depth mathematical treatment of derivatives and is divided into three parts: (1) options; (2) futures and forwards; and (3) other derivative instruments, which include options on futures, foreign currency derivatives, swaps, exotic options, and financial engineering. The emphasis is placed on equity instruments, although there is also some coverage of short-and long-term interest bearing instruments.

Elective #1 (chosen among variety of graduate level business courses) (2 credits)
Elective #2 (chosen among variety of graduate level business courses) (2 credits)



Investments Advanced Curriculum (18 credits)

ACC 672           Advanced Financial Analysis (2 credits)
Advanced Financial Analysis and Valuation builds on the analytical techniques developed in the basic financial statement analysis course, Accounting 670: Financial Reporting and Analysis, to augment your understanding of more complex financial reporting issues and to introduce you to the valuation of equity investments. The viewpoint is that of the user of financial statements, particularly from the standpoint of an equity investor or purchaser of a business. We discuss each financial reporting issue in terms of its effect on assessments of a firm’s profitability and risk.  This course is designed primarily for students who expect to be intensive users of financial statements as part of their professional responsibilities.

FIN 651           Advanced Topics in Investments (2 credits)
This course is about applying finance theory to the practice of investments. Topics include building a term structure model, building a fixed income portfolio, performance standards and measurement, and the role of futures and options in portfolios.

FIN 653           Alternative Investments (2 credits)
The course provides an advanced theoretical and practical understanding of various alternative investment strategies, with a specific focus on derivatives (e.g., interest rate and credit derivatives), venture capital and private equity investments, and real estate investments. The course also examines how macro-economic, technological, labor market, taxes and regulatory issues affect specific investment decisions. In addition, the students learn about valuation, investment and risk management strategies of sophisticated investors and recent chronology of events that affect market participants.

FIN 660           International Finance (2 credits)
Finance 660 builds on Finance 641 and 642, and introduces students to the concepts that are important in today’s dramatically changing global economy. The course covers the international monetary system; the interrelationship between national economies through the balance of payments; the economic relationships that determine a currency’s value relative to other currencies and real goods; the markets and instruments of international finance; currency crises and contagion; the hedging of international risk exposure; and international portfolio investment.

FIN 674           Financial Analysis of Mergers and Acquisitions (2 credits)
This course is designed to develop an understanding of (1) the economic and financial issues involved in the acquisition of a company; (2) the analytical valuation tools used to evaluate an acquisition; and (3) potential and empirical stock market reaction to an acquisition. Students are then asked to apply their understanding of the issues to analyze cases involving various aspects of acquisition.

FIN 683           Financial Modeling (2 credits)
This course takes a variety of finance topics and implements them using practical spreadsheet models. Students will use the intent and financial databases to obtain input data for their models. Students will learn Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to design functions and macros that will enhance their models. In addition to class time, this course will meet in a computer lab (a classroom) for hands-on instruction. Students are presumed to have a working knowledge of Windows and Excel.

FIN 685           Mathematics of Financial Derivatives (2 credits)
Finance 685 builds on Finance 650, 660, and 670. This course provides an in-depth mathematical treatment of derivatives and is divided into three parts: (1) options; (2) futures and forwards; and (3) other derivative instruments, which include options on futures, foreign currency derivatives, swaps, exotic options, and financial engineering. The emphasis is placed on equity instruments, although there is also some coverage of short-and long-term interest bearing instruments.

Elective #1 (chosen among variety of graduate level business courses) (2 credits)
Elective #2 (chosen among variety of graduate level business courses) (2 credits)



International Finance Advanced Curriculum (18 credits)

ECO 695           Global Economics (2 credits)
This is a course in global economics with focus on economic policies and country risk. We study the aggregate behavior of macroeconomics variables that are relevant for business decisions. We take into account the interaction of the national economy with the rest of the world. In other words, we do global economics and study the roles of monetary and fiscal policies in an open economy, foreign direct investment, and the exchange rate.

BSL 692           Legal Implications of International Business Transactions (2 credits)
International legal framework, transactional legal issues in finance, marketing, management, and distribution. Case studies in substantive international legal topics such as international sales contracts, international documentary sale, international terms of trade, legal implications and substantive rules governing international finance, collections, payments, and letter of credit, the resolution of international disputes with a particular emphasis and examination upon the management of litigation, enforcement of foreign judgments, and alternative dispute resolution are also included.

FIN 651           Advanced Topics in Investments (2 credits)
This course is about applying finance theory to the practice of investments. Topics include building a term structure model, building a fixed income portfolio, performance standards and measurement, and the role of futures and options in portfolios.

FIN 653            Alternative Investments (2 credits)
The course provides an advanced theoretical and practical understanding of various alternative investment strategies, with a specific focus on derivatives (e.g., interest rate and credit derivatives), venture capital and private equity investments, and real estate investments. The course also examines how macro-economic, technological, labor market, taxes and regulatory issues affect specific investment decisions. In addition, the students learn about valuation, investment and risk management strategies of sophisticated investors and recent chronology of events that affect market participants.

FIN 661           Advanced International Finance (2 credits)
Finance 661 builds directly on Finance 660 and on the MBA core classes, Finance 641 and 642, using a variety of techniques, including group projects and class discussion. A number of special topics are covered including measuring and managing the many additional risk exposures faced by a multi-national enterprise, investment decisions in a global framework, and financing the multi-national firm.

FIN 671           Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance (2 credits)
This course builds directly on Finance 670 and on the MBA core classes, Finance 641 and Finance 642, and relies mainly on the analysis and vigorous class discussion of a variety of real-world cases. The cases cover a broad range of topics, including short-and long-term financing, capital budgeting decisions, corporate valuation, hedging with options and futures, dividend policy and share repurchases, corporate financial strategy, and other current issues in corporate finance.

FIN 683           Financial Modeling (2 credits)
This course takes a variety of finance topics and implements them using practical spreadsheet models. Students will use the intent and financial databases to obtain input data for their models. Students will learn Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) to design functions and macros that will enhance their models. In addition to class time, this course will meet in a computer lab (a classroom) for hands-on instruction. Students are presumed to have a working knowledge of Windows and Excel.

FIN 685           Mathematics of Financial Derivatives (2 credits)
Finance 685 builds on Finance 650, 660, and 670. This course provides an in-depth mathematical treatment of derivatives and is divided into three parts: (1) options; (2) futures and forwards; and (3) other derivative instruments, which include options on futures, foreign currency derivatives, swaps, exotic options, and financial engineering. The emphasis is placed on equity instruments, although there is also some coverage of short-and long-term interest bearing instruments.

Elective (chosen among variety of graduate level business courses) (2 credits) 



    School of Business Administration
    P.O. Box 248027, Coral Gables, Florida 33124-6520
 
 
TEL: 305-284-4643
FAX: 305-284-6526
 
GRADUATE: 305-284-2510
UNDERGRADUATE: 305-284-4641